477: Sweet Little Lies
477: Sweet Little Lies
Coder Radio

We debate the lies our tool makers tell us, if Clojure has a Rails-sized hole, and the secrets of a successful software engineer.

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@woden501
3,000 sats
4 Aug
Why use VIM? Because sometimes you just need to have a text editor or two, and a couple of terminal sessions open in tmux panes at one time that you can quickly swap back and forth between on that headless server that is your team's only available development environment so that you can fix whatever God awful thing that new junior dev just managed to do to your Docker stacks to bring half your platform down and your entire team to a standstill. Any IDE can just get in the way sometimes.
@oaguy1
2,222 sats
7 Aug
Text editing is an art. Vim and emacs are foundational tools in that art. Learning these tools, especially vim, gives you a chance to learn and master this art. Think of vim as a monestary where you learn from the old, wise monks. Some choose to stay on in the monestary while others go off to use other tools such as VS Code and JetBrains. Also, on a practical note, vim opens instantly and is therefore good for incidental editing, such as git commit messages. I even write all my markdown in vim.
@megastrik3
2,222 sats
3 Aug
Hey Chris and Mike! As an aspiring software engineer love the show. You have talked in the past about your kids playing Minecraft. Have your heard of the controversy around the 1.19.1 moderation update? I see Minecraft as an example of an open source game, and this update makes me worried about the future of the game and the community. I'm curious to hear your takes on the situation. Thanks for all your hard work.
@kpovoc
2,222 sats
5 Aug
Upgraded episode number boost! +1 to getting Wes back on the show. Need all the Clojure love/exposure we can get. The article made a good point about stale libraries. I wonder if being built on Java and being able to pull in existing libraries is part of the problem (whether or not they meet the clojurist philosophy). Wish Wes could make it a permanent 3some like LUP. Mike the pragmatist, Wes the idealist, and Chris the referee.
@redgreenrefactor
2,048 sats
3 Aug
I still use vim because it supports my workflow the best. Neovim supports LSP servers now so I can get all of the smart completion that VSCode offers but have the power to customize the behavior to exactly how I like to work.
@ibuki
210 sats
3 Aug
Thanks 🐍